Posts Tagged New York

Halloween Color

Halloween Color . . .

Halloween Foliage: Somewhere in New York
(10 30 2018)

Perhaps the most iconic Halloween image is the bright orange pumpkin. Leaves of the sugar maple have a similar shade, and the wildflowers of the late autumn, if not ghost white, are a shade of yellow, gold, or Halloween orange.


Northern Bush-honeysuckle:
Diervilla lonicera
(NY 10 30 2018)

— rps 10 31 2018

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Bloomsday 2018

Bloomsday 2018

Clover . . . Bloom.
(NYC 06 2018)

Today is June 16, the date immortalized in James Joyce’s novel, Ulysses, the day now come to be called . . .

Bloomsday.

– rPs 06 16 2018

Postscript: Read the full Bloomsday story from the WWV archives here: https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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8 Great Years

8 Great Years . . .

Spring Snow
(NYC 03 22 2018)

The flowers of Tuesday’s Vernal Equinox now rest under snow. The thaw can be expected soon, though, the white of crystalized water replaced again by blooming wildflowers. Until then . . .

Happy 8th Anniversary, Wildflowers of the West Village.

– rPs 03 22 2018

Postscript: You can revisit the view that instilled an ever growing idea in March 2010: https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/03/22/welcome/

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The End of November

The End of November . . .

Asteraceae Gone to Seed
(NYC 11 26 2017)

One of the aspects to appreciate most during the growing season’s latter half is the evolution of the predominate color. The tired greens of September give way to the splendid yellows of October that age into the russet spread seen by the end of November.

Wildflowers on the ground have mostly gone to seed by this time. The leaves up above that remain rustle in the tannic tones of the oaks. Here is where the color action remains.

Deciduous leaves often lumped under the generic descriptive “brown” resemble many of the cooked dishes on a plentiful table of Thanksgiving. The same kind of variety is actually present within that one color. One can see tan, rust, ochre, and many more. If, by the end of November, one cannot find a plant in bloom at their feet, pause, and look up . . .

November Splendor
(NYC 11 27 2017)

. . . where the plant world meets the sky.

— rPs 11 30 2017

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Teasel Season

Teasel Season . . .

Thistle Season For Teasel
(pencil on paper)
(NYC 10 2017)

I have been drawn, pun there yet unintended; I have been drawn to draw, sketch, the crown of the teasel this season.

family Caprifoliaceae

Along the way, to consistent degree in scope and scale, still bloom the:

Mallow

Mallow
(NYC 10 2017)

Lady’s Thumb

Lady’s Thumb: A Wild Buckwheat
(NYC 10 2017)

White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot
(NYC 10 2017)

Seaside Goldenrod

Seaside Goldenrod
(NYC 10 2017)

Ganoderma

Ganoderma
(NYC 10 2017)

Autumn Highlights Here, Now.

– rPs 10 24 2017

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Brown Flowers

Brown Flowers . . .

Brown Flower (NYC 01 2017)

Brown Flower
(NYC 01 2017)

Winds like sudden change bring a dust devil three stories tall. The spiral appears, carries fallen brown leaves and other debris as it pauses, then passes through a rear courtyard in Manhattan. Yesterday there was rain, a week before, snow.

January Snow (NYC 01 2017)

January Snow
(NYC 01 2017)

Temperature. Precipitation. Wind. — The planet has a trio of tools to modulate the weather. This new year has experienced all three in just as many weeks. Climate changes almost day to day with a strobe effect at this local level.

January began with snow under the clearest, cleanest blue and white sky, the nested web of tree bark browns giving glimpses of rows of great buildings beyond.

Snow does not linger under rain. White turns into the waterlogged tans and yellowed green of the unconstructed ground when the fog rolls in with spattered showers. Park turf begins to feel like marsh. Even cross-country runners stick to the hard paths.

January Rain (NYC 01 2017)

January Rain
(NYC 01 2017)

This marks the peak season of the brown flowers. Skeletal remnants of several species continue to covey beauty. There remains a multiplicity of forms to compensate for less diversity of color.

Asteraceae. Brassicaceae. – Asters. Goldenrod. Thistles. Peppercress. – Their upright tresses stand symmetrical, architectural.

There remains a multiplicity of forms to compensate for less diversity of color.

Wildflower beauty endures all kinds of changes in the weather, so far.

– rPs 01 22 2017

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Autumn Whites

Autumn Whites . . .

White Aster & Snakeroot (Manhattan, NYC, 11 2016)

White Aster & Snakeroot
(Manhattan, NYC, 11 2016)

Russet variation of deciduous oaks and maples see their feet dressed in filigree of wildflower white as sparse as lace, or as morning frost on lawn, or the first accumulated dusting of flurries.

Friends appear like snowflakes clung to a window. … ”

Lines of poems shaped like prose recited aloud in the out of doors can be a symptom, if one allows it, of mind, perhaps your own, ruminating, meeting, encountering such attractive intersections of nature and the city.

Here it remains, on the west side of Manhattan, where civil island meets tidal river at a time when sun sets are fast and temperatures bring a shiver.

The cold months are hinted on the rippled gray sky, felt on the wind, not far.

– rPs 11 21 2016

 

Postscript: Thanksgiving is on the menu. Centerpiece: Wildflower White (Asteraceae, various)

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