Archive for Wildflowers: White

Bloomsday 2020

Bloomsday 2020 . . .

White Clover, Trifolium repens
(NYC 06 2020)

Bloomsday, the novel 24 hours by James Joyce celebrated on this day, may have to be a virtual communal experience this year. No grand public readings, straw hats, bowties, or summer dresses celebrated under a bright blue and white sky.

One may still go out in the fine weather to the park to smell the clover, perhaps the most Irish of wildflowers. Spend some time there, distanced safely on a park bench, or on a blanket spread on the ground, book in hand held by the odyssey of Leopold Bloom.

Pink Clover, Trifolium pratense
(NYC 06 2020)

Happy Bloomsday, 2020.

(NYC 06 16 2020)

— rPs 06 16 2020

Postscript: You can read WWV’s original Joycean odyssey here:
https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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May Flowers of Manhattan

May Flowers of Manhattan . . .

Yellow Flag
(NYC 05 2020)

City wildflowers have never lifted my spirits more than during this month of May. Morning walks home from my essential worksite have cleansed my mind, filled my lungs with fresh air, and filled my eyes with life worth living. Views in bloom I hope will be the main lasting memory I keep of this chequered pandemic time.

Here are a few thousand words worth of photos to convey the magnificence of this May in Manhattan:

Wild Columbine

Wild Columbine, Aquilegia canadensis
(NYC 05 2020)

Shepherd’s Purse

Shepherd’s Purse, Capsella bursa-pastoris
(NYC 05 2020)

English Plantain

English Plantain, Plantago lanceolata
(NYC 05 31 2020)

And last, and perhaps most iconic: the always cheerful Common Dandelion

Common Dandelion, Taraxacum officinale
(NYC 05 31 2020)

All the above and more can be seen now during a walk through the city’s many green spaces. Grab a mask, and go . . .

The Green Path
(NYC 05 2020)

— rPs 05 31 2020

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Mild Winter Early Birds

Mild Winter Early Birds . . .

Forsythia in February!
(NYC 02 12 2020)

You can tell a winter season is a mild one when the mourning dove wakes you with its morning call as early as the middle of February.

Rain rather than snow with plenty of sun in between has brought early flowering greens along with the songbirds. Leap year adds an additional day to the second month of the year, and what’s become clear is this one has been warmer just as Punxsutawney Phil predicted. A brief walk in the park or down a garden block encounters:

Bittercress

Cardamine hirsuta
(02 28 2020)

Chickweed

Stellara media
(NYC 02 23 2020)

Grounsel

Senecio vulgaris
(02 28 2020)

Birds and blooms already in February may forshadow a healthy 2020 growing season for New York City, and a hot one, too.

— rPs 02 29 2020

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Reason for Hope

Reason for Hope . . .

First Snopdrop Sighting:
Galanthus nivalis
(NYC 01 31 2020)

January is either a damp cold colored brown, white, and gray during a walk outside, or the sky above is a transluscent blue lens magnifying sun and wind into a bright frigid bluster.

Life greets first losses of the year especially hard. Hard to lose a personal hero, Neil Peart, who was quite clear and correct in the title track from the Rush LP Presto: “I generate more heat than light.”

Peart was an avid cyclist and birder in between life as a recording artist and author. He inspired (the “heat” to create). Role models as such it follows I am an avid cyclist and documentarian of urban flora, indiginous and immigrant, in between life as an author.

Sad, too, to lose one who makes us laugh (Monty Python’s Terry Jones) and who’s sheer elevation of life lifts us (NBA and Oscar winner, Kobe Bryant).

Saying goodbye, letting go, tasks in life always never easy. The reason for hope in all that can be found; it emerges like a snowdrop from the remnants of last year’s leaf fall. The first flower of the year near month’s end is like a lawn bathed in January sun. Bright and alive, the thaw, temporary perhaps, but a reminder new life follows from the former; everything continues.

Winter Season Variety:
Groundsel, Senecio vulgaris, and others.
(01 2020)


— rPs 01 31 2020

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Autumnal Apiaceae

Autumnal Apiaceae . . .

Queen Anne’s Lace: Family Apiaceae
(NYC 09 2019)

Fall arrives late this year, the 23rd of September, on a sunny day as hot as July.

Although it doesn’t quite feel like it, day and night are in balance. Tomorrow begins the speedy transition to shorter days and fall season temperatures.

Meanwhile, the plant world remains green, for now, and the late season palate of white predominates among those still in bloom. The most visible examples are the broad umbels of the wild carrot, Queen Anne’s Lace, Daucus carota.

Living bouquet can be found in bloom throughout the NYC area along fences, beside lamp posts, and even sprouting from the spaces between the stone walls lining the Hudson River.

Lamp Post Bouquet
(NYC 09 2019)

— rPs 09 23 2019

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Through the Fence

Through the Fence . . .

Asiatic Dayflower:
Commelina communis
(NYC 08 26 2019)

Property shaped by fences is a reality in the developed and redeveloping city. A fence, though, not be just used to keep some thing or some one out. A fence can aso keep things contained in a sustained, unmolested zone of wild flowering green.

Bittersweet Nightshade:
Solanum dulcamara
(NYC 08 27 2019)

A blooming even so in August, the late last of the growing season, when the sun still hangs high over the region’s annual dry season.

Canada Thistle:
Cirsium arvense
(NYC 08 27 2019)

Sun, followed by a late afternoon shower that keeps the city parks in formal, and informal, flower.

Phytolacca americana
(NYC 08 28 2019)

This time of year it is pleasant to peek through the fence if on the other side there are wildflowers.

— rPs 08 28 2019

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Bloomsday 2019

Bloomsday 2019 . . .

Trifolium pratense

Bloomsday on a Father’s Day Sunday, 2019 celebrates quite a packed, stacked, and weighty day for the wildflowers situated in sutu within a peak perlod of . . . bloom:

Chicorium

Chicory
(NYC 06 2019)

Malva

Mallow
(NYC 06 2019)

Brassica

Wild Mustard
(NYC 06 2019)

Solanum

Bittersweet Nightshade
(NYC 06 2019)

Circium

Canada Thistle
(NYC 06 2019)

ReJoyce and Enjoy!

(NYC 06 16 2019)

— rPs 06 16 2019

Postscript: Read WWV’s original Joycean odyssey here:
https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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September Contrast

September Contrast . . .

Rainy Day Salad: Dayflower, Lady’s Thumb, Pokeweed
(09 2018)

September, full of promise, and fast going.

The ninth month in New York City is often a gray and green temperate deluge, or else a sun, golden, set in a bluebird bright sky, high and dry.

One natural extreme, or the other, contrast with very little, an almost imperceptible, transition time if you get some sleep overnight.

Late-Summer Whites: Asters & Snakeroot
(09 2018)

— rPs 09 30 2018

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Bloomsday 2018

Bloomsday 2018

Clover . . . Bloom.
(NYC 06 2018)

Today is June 16, the date immortalized in James Joyce’s novel, Ulysses, the day now come to be called . . .

Bloomsday.

– rPs 06 16 2018

Postscript: Read the full Bloomsday story from the WWV archives here: https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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Flores de Mayo

Flores de Mayo . . .

Viola sororia
(NYC 05 06 2018)

Instant summer temperatures in the center heart of the spring season have made Manhattan bloom at the start of May.

Just a few days of sun and shower have combined to turn the blue, white, and brown tones of the cold season into a multicolored outdoor scene anchored in green:

Dandelion

Taraxicum officinale
(NYC 05 06 2018)

Dead-nettle

Lamium purpureum
(NYC 05 06 2018)

English Plaintain

Plantago lanceolata
(NYC 05 06 2018)

Garlic Mustard

Alliarim petiolata
(NYC 05 06 2018)

And one for the late Gary Lincoff, mycologist, guide, and author, who left us in Manhattan on March 16th:

Order Agaricales: for Gary
(NYC 05 05 2018)

Memories remain as May flowers on the West Side of Manhattan.

— rPs 05 06 2018

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