Archive for Wildflowers: Pink

August Harvest

August Harvest . . .

A summer salad of Asiatic dayflower, Galinsoga, and Lady’s Thumb.
(NYC 08 31 2020)

Family and friends have begun to share photos, and salads, from their gardens as the month of August comes to a close. The wild patches of Manhattan’s west side have also reached their peak of productivity.

A morning walk, or a stroll to watch the evening sun set behind the Hudson, will also be accompanied by a diverse harvest of native and immigrant wildflowers in full bloom and fruit. This salad bar of sorts includes:

American Pokeweed, Phytolacca americana

(NYC 08 17 2020)

Bittersweet Nightshade, Solanum dulcamara

(NYC 08 31 2020)

Broadleaf Plantain, Plantago major

(NYC 08 31 2020)

Butter and Eggs, Linaria vulgaris

(08 08 2020)

Chicory, Cichorium intybus

(NYC 08 2020)

Common Black Nightshade, Solanum nigrum

(NYC 08 17 2020)

Common Mallow, Malva neglecta

(NYC 08 17 2020)

Galinsoga, Galinsoga parviflora

(NYC 08 17 2020)

Lady’s Thumb, Persicaria maculosa

(NYC 08 17 2020)

Marestail, Conyza canadensis

(NYC 08 31 2020)

There is quite a selection to see. August’s harvest is here.

— rPs 08 31 2020

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Bloomsday 2020

Bloomsday 2020 . . .

White Clover, Trifolium repens
(NYC 06 2020)

Bloomsday, the novel 24 hours by James Joyce celebrated on this day, may have to be a virtual communal experience this year. No grand public readings, straw hats, bowties, or summer dresses celebrated under a bright blue and white sky.

One may still go out in the fine weather to the park to smell the clover, perhaps the most Irish of wildflowers. Spend some time there, distanced safely on a park bench, or on a blanket spread on the ground, book in hand held by the odyssey of Leopold Bloom.

Pink Clover, Trifolium pratense
(NYC 06 2020)

Happy Bloomsday, 2020.

(NYC 06 16 2020)

— rPs 06 16 2020

Postscript: You can read WWV’s original Joycean odyssey here:
https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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Through the Fence

Through the Fence . . .

Asiatic Dayflower:
Commelina communis
(NYC 08 26 2019)

Property shaped by fences is a reality in the developed and redeveloping city. A fence, though, not be just used to keep some thing or some one out. A fence can aso keep things contained in a sustained, unmolested zone of wild flowering green.

Bittersweet Nightshade:
Solanum dulcamara
(NYC 08 27 2019)

A blooming even so in August, the late last of the growing season, when the sun still hangs high over the region’s annual dry season.

Canada Thistle:
Cirsium arvense
(NYC 08 27 2019)

Sun, followed by a late afternoon shower that keeps the city parks in formal, and informal, flower.

Phytolacca americana
(NYC 08 28 2019)

This time of year it is pleasant to peek through the fence if on the other side there are wildflowers.

— rPs 08 28 2019

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High Celsius Cirsium

High Celsius Circium . . .

Thistle: genus Cirsium
(NYC 07 2019

July has baked in an actual sense. Hot days, humid, sun bright and still. New York City heats.

Somewhat in the shadows, ar the base of some shade trees, both native and immigrant thistle species of human stature may be found in vigorus bloom on the green West Side of Manhattan.

High Celcius Circium . . .

— rPs 07 31 2019

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Bloomsday 2019

Bloomsday 2019 . . .

Trifolium pratense

Bloomsday on a Father’s Day Sunday, 2019 celebrates quite a packed, stacked, and weighty day for the wildflowers situated in sutu within a peak perlod of . . . bloom:

Chicorium

Chicory
(NYC 06 2019)

Malva

Mallow
(NYC 06 2019)

Brassica

Wild Mustard
(NYC 06 2019)

Solanum

Bittersweet Nightshade
(NYC 06 2019)

Circium

Canada Thistle
(NYC 06 2019)

ReJoyce and Enjoy!

(NYC 06 16 2019)

— rPs 06 16 2019

Postscript: Read WWV’s original Joycean odyssey here:
https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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Earth Day 49

Earth Day 49 . . .

The author of Philadelphia on the Fly celebrates Earth Day “by the book” . . .
(Planet Earth 04 22 2019)

Earth Day has reached the cusp of a human’s middle age. The planet remains older, larger, and more important than all of us people put together. Let us try, at least try, to be stewards and gardeners and protectors rather than mere users of our one and only green, white, and blue home.

Trout lily and others spring into being.
(04 2019)

Earth Day 2019.

— rPs 04 22 2019

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Wild Fruits of the West Village

Wild Fruits of the West Village . . .

Rhus coriaria
(NYC 07 2018)


The growing season appears good. Strung between brights days have been beads of clouded days flush with rain enough to make the city green space lush.

The crabapple grove in the park is so much an orchard as the roadside strip of sumac bearing berries ripe for the making of cool drinks. Many of the fruiting trees are now heavy with their fruit.

Malus
(NYC 07 2018)


And some has already dropped to damp earth.

Ginkgo biloba
(NYC 2018)


— rPs 07 31 2018

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Teasel Season

Teasel Season . . .

Thistle Season For Teasel
(pencil on paper)
(NYC 10 2017)

I have been drawn, pun there yet unintended; I have been drawn to draw, sketch, the crown of the teasel this season.

family Caprifoliaceae

Along the way, to consistent degree in scope and scale, still bloom the:

Mallow

Mallow
(NYC 10 2017)

Lady’s Thumb

Lady’s Thumb: A Wild Buckwheat
(NYC 10 2017)

White Snakeroot

White Snakeroot
(NYC 10 2017)

Seaside Goldenrod

Seaside Goldenrod
(NYC 10 2017)

Ganoderma

Ganoderma
(NYC 10 2017)

Autumn Highlights Here, Now.

– rPs 10 24 2017

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Bloomsday 2017

Bloomsday 2017 . . .

Trifolium Trio
(NYC 06 2017)

Today is Bloomsday.

Title Page:
Ulysses by James Joyce
(NYC 06 16 2017)

Re(ad)-Joyce.

– rPs 06 16 2017

Postscript: Reconnect with the original wwv Bloomsday story here:

https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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Summer, Solanum

Summer, Solanum . . .

Solanum nigrum, Manhattan. (08 2015)

Solanum nigrum,
Manhattan.
(08 2015)

New York City wakes to the light of August and the news of fifty days and counting when temperatures have held at 80 degree Fahrenheit or more.

Humidity feeds the air and makes the air felt. The act of breathing becomes an even damper labor requiring calories if on a run to survey wildflowers along Manhattan’s banks of the Hudson River.

Inland, the islands holds tree pits colonized like a kind of microcosm of monoculture. Within squares sprout Galinsoga, Lady’s Thumb, Yellow Sow Thistle, and Marestail.

Marestail, Conyza canadensis, Manhattan. (08 2015)

Marestail,
Conyza canadensis,
Manhattan.
(08 2015)

Not so much the Asiatic Dayflower. Commelina cummunis, which appreciates seasons of high water and a more modest light.

Asiatic Dayflower does not take to prolonged direct sun exposure. (08 2015)

Asiatic Dayflower does not take to prolonged direct sun exposure.
(08 2015)

This season being dry, and hot, one of the most common sights are of tiny black tomatoes hanging in sparse clumps from vigorous stems and ovate green leaves supporting also tiny flowers that resemble sunnyside eggs shaped into five petals arranged as a star.

Solanum nigrum, the Nightshade. August in the Nightshade, or . . .

. . . a Summer, Solanum, with some others remains the steady news of the day.

– rPs 08 26 2015

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