Archive for Wildflowers: Green

Year’s End on Track 2016

Year’s End on Track 2016 . . .

Manhattan Carolers (NYBG, NYC, 2016)

Manhattan Carolers
(NYBG, NYC, 2016)

Darkest days of the year descend into darkness when the sun meets the western horizon in a wink’s flash, gone. The lights of the city sparkle to compensate, fill the still cityscape and its river reflections with electric holiday color light.

Perhaps this is why the year’s blooming wild remain near lamp posts and patches off path that capture, even if briefly, the intensity of a low setting sun.

Chenopodium & Lamp Post  (NYC 2016)

Chenopodium & Lamp Post
(NYC 2016)

And another, newer season of light arises.

Our friends at the New York Botanical Garden permitted a contemplative opportunity to see organic plant materials take the form of New York City at the 25th annual Holiday Train Show. Paul Fusse and a squad of artisans have produced a cathartic botanical experience when the landscapes outside stand brown and in slumber under sudden snow.

Inside, under glass, a space large enough to house a copse of trees presents lights on, trains roll. Landmark towers, bridges, and stadiums share trackside space along its length with residential scenes. One favorite, the trio of apartments, rowed side by side, electric lit, stand like singing carolers on a December’s evening.

‘Tis the Season . . . With snow now on the western edge of Manhattan

Snow in Manhattan (NYC 12 17 2016)

Snow in Manhattan
(NYC 12 17 2016)

— rPs 12 19 2016

Postscript:

Read more about artist Paul Fusse and his team of artisans on the NYBG website listed under the Blogroll, or follow this link: http://www.nybg.org/hts16/

Read more about NYC’s regional rail in the new book by author Walter E. Zullig: http://morningsunbooks.com/products/metro-north-in-color-br-i-small-available-october-1-2016-small-i

In memory of Louis J. Amici, Jr. (1947-2016) and Jeff Feldmeier (1966-2016). They always met the train on time.

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What’s The Big Stink?

What’s The Big Stink? . . .

Skunk Cabbage April 2014

Vase on the Forest Floor: Symplocarpus. This North American native is stinky, too. (NYC, April)

Flower in the news . . . Flower in the news in New York City:

What’s the Big Stink?

Good News about to bloom:

My friends at the New York Botanical Garden have enjoyed sharing a rare moment with a most distinctive flowering plant:

Amorphophallus titanum is set to bloom.

 

“What’s the Big Stink?” When the plant flowers the source of that classic phrase may be known.

One may first hear a name: The Corpse Flower.

Omen? As it may have been when one last bloomed in NYC in 1939? Perhaps.

Magnificent? Certain. The scale, the distinctiveness of size and aroma of this plant nurtured “a decade in the making” has, for all that time, communicated enough to us to garner human attention and celebration.

“Bravo!” to . . . THE BLOOM.

— rPs 07 27 2016

 

Postscript: Visit the New York Botanical Garden and view the Corpse Flower Cam by following this link: NYBG/125  http://www.nybg.org/exhibitions/2016/corpse-flower.php

 

One may also visit in the field the somewhat similar, and indigenous, Skunk Cabbage , Symplocarpus, across the New York City area in March:  https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2016/03/21/anniversary-spring/

 

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Summer Blooms

Summer Blooms . . .

 

Plantago major 06 2016

Broadleaf Plantain, Plantago major (NYC 06 2016)

 

Bloomsday passed with a literary flourish on June 16 and now, just a few days later, Summer is here in New York City, or rather as of 6:34 p.m. Eastern Standard Time today, June 20.

Rain or shine, this is the peak time for the Wildflowers of the West Village. Multiple species, in some cases multiples varieties of the same genus, such as the plantains (Plantago) can be found edging lawns and other green spaces throughout the Five Boroughs.

Have a great summer season.

 

Plantago lanceolata 06 2016

English Plantain, Plantago lanceolata (NYC 06 2016)

 

– rPs 06 20 2016

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Three Gravestones

Three Gravestones . . .

 

Van Cortlandt Park Massacre NYC Spring 2016

SHAME: Part of the vast ongoing massacre of old deciduous trees falling to the saw in Riverside and Van Cortlandt Park this season. (NYC Spring 2016)

I.

Better views demand now.

Immigrants turned “invasive!”

Old trees around cut down

By naturalized non- natives?

 

Cattails In Seed Spring 2016

Cattails: Spring Gone To Seed (NYC 2016)

II.

Passing, cattail flowers seed,

Parachute lives, each on its own,

Scattered, carried, by the wind

Betting to reach free ground.

 

Willow NYC Spring 2016

Willow (NYC 2016)

 

III.

Green, again,

Gone the limber down.

Bead chains of brightest green

Drape over rain swelled brown.

 

– rPs 04 18 2016

.

Postscript: April is National Poetry Month. Enjoy.

https://www.poets.org/national-poetry-month/home

.

Report Illegal Tree Cutting in NYC here:

http://www.nycgovparks.org/services/forestry/illegal-tree-work

.

in memory of Robert L. Bogaski, Jr. (1949-2016) . . .

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Anniversary Spring

Anniversary Spring . . .

Trio of Leaves: Symplocarpus (NYC 03 2016)

Trio of Leaves: Symplocarpus
(NYC, 03 2016)

Six (6!) years ago the concept of “Wildflowers of the West Village” conceived in liberty an ongoing mission to serve History. The best is, as the rest, and seeks out to answer what untended wild exists on the western edge of Manhattan during the early twenty-first century.

Report as a journalist: craft, ethics, objectivity. Write as a poet within the standard prose traditions of Natural History. The fact the flora explorations offer exercise at whatever fitness level one desires has extended and sustained a silver lining to my distance running life for two score plus of years.

Spring Equinox 2016 gusted in near 12:30 a.m. EST with preparations readied for a citywide snow storm that arrived only as brief periods of spritzing sleet. The predominant weather pattern has remained bluebird skies, sun bright, almost white, the atmosphere blowing on strong sustained winds.

Some outings may be more of a hike than a run. Sometimes both are combined for various effects. Spring time gives the city good air before the pollen count commences, great times to be out of doors.

Full sun bathed one such exertion combo around the leafy stretches of NYC’s parks. Marshy areas call for lighter stepping. I attempt to not even leave footprints. A drier winter has left marsh in place under a dry intact leaf carpet in most areas. One spot of perhaps an acre did stand out as wet as expected. Brush nested in oak leaves, which received sun later in the afternoon. Within that section there rested a spot near a tannic puddle bottomed in saturated oak leaves. Nearby stood distinctive green candle flame spires rooted in a patterned purple almost ceramic in appearance; there the new green shoots of the soon to be enormous Skunk Cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus.

Sighted often on spring hikes, near the water waded in search of trout, some enormous verdant “verde” ears may be seen by early April. Fly fishers may take note stoneflies and bees are attracted to the plant, inedible and indelicate of odor to most humans. The health and vigor and native green this species gives to one’s eyes a fresh bloom to the picture; a kind of green quotation to the predominant three brown, white, and blue.

Skunk Cabbage could just as easily be called Woodpecker Cabbage, or Trout Cabbage, given its time of emergence and the other active living species gathered and about around the days surrounding the Spring Equinox.

“Phenology.”

Symplocarpus
may be NYC’s first native thumb up for another growing season, perhaps like a first tuba in spring’s unfolding symphony of green. Skunk Cabbage takes its place with all the other wildflowers of the West Village, and beyond.

Happy 6th Anniversary, Wildflowers of the West Village. Spring, 2016.

Six Spires Green Beside the Path: Symplocarpus (NYC, 03 2016)

Six Spires Green Beside the Path: Symplocarpus
(NYC, 03 2016)

– rPs 03 21 2016

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February Flowers Green

February Flowers Green . . .

Manhattan Lichen 02 2016

Manhattan Lichen,  Candelariella and Cladonia. (02 2016)

Wind may be heard in the ears on the first afternoon, followed by daylight hours of stillness. Snow melts under scattered showers over a few overcast February days. Water, cold and clean, drips and drops over rocks, down trunks, and brings early green into bloom in Manhattan.

Soft light from a variegated gray sky gives conditions bright for the Lichens, Candelariella and Cladonia. The wash over stones swells cracks as well as sustains the Moss, Leucobryum:

Leucobryum Moss 02 2016

Pin Cushion Moss, Leucobryum, NYC. (02 2016)

 

Some views are so rendered by nature to appear as Art in itself that should be viewed but not walked upon. Take in a lawn sprinkled with the bristled iron brown fruits of the Sweetgum, Liquidambar, then move along. The Path: the fact, like the philosophy, when followed keeps the pristine that way.

Sweetgum Grove 02 2016

Sweetgum Grove, NYC. (02 2016)

 

Wet and gloomy, perhaps the middle of Winter can affect some psyche’s in that manner. The difference comes as the following days see a break, often bright and breezy, marking the conclusion of a February rain cycle, as did this one in 2016. Afterward, bedded in oak leaf litter, the Onion Grass, Romulea, stands refreshed, as does the viewer, the person turned away from interior and exterior screens and instead focused on the living open air found outside during February in Manhattan.

Onion Grass 02 2016

Onion Grass in the Oak Leaves, NYC. (02 2016)

 

– rPs 02 22 2016

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Veterans

Veterans . . .

Butter & Eggs after rain on Veterans Day, 2015.

Butter & Eggs after rain on Veterans Day, 2015.

Wildflowers, those exposed to so much stress in urban environments, may be presumed to have wrapped up blooming activity by November. Not so along the western edge of Manhattan. Cool wet days under breezy white sky have in succession invigorated lawns and edges alike on the island of Manhattan. The lush green beds support a casserole of multicolored leaves.

The gold of the Ginkgo and Weeping Willow complement the burnt orange of the Sugar Maple, the evergreen and yellow variations of the Norway Maple. The flutter of the individual Black Locust, tiny in comparison to that of the London Plane Tree and Black Oak, dry leaves when stiff the size of a desert plate.

My favorites of the blooming foliage include the fiery tones of the American Sumac, the intricate stylish spades of the living fossil, the Tulip Tree, and the full spectrum splendor of the Liquid Amber, the Sweetgum.

Standing, blooming in their way on the trunks of such trees, one can find lichen in full vigor:

Lichen 11 11 2015

Mushrooms like the Amanita reside in the leaf litter:

November Amanita 11 11 2015

Wildflowers, the second wind of sorts, numerous veterans, though perhaps plain or small or scattered, bloom now in great variety and number. Goldenrod, Galinsoga, Lady’s Thumb, and the Dandelion all still flower here and there. Others encountered during a run in the park may include:

Chicory, Chicorium intybus

Chicory 11 11 2015

Mallow, Marva parviflora

Malva parviflora 11 11 2015

Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris

Mugwort 11 11 2015

Nightshade, Solanum

Nightshade 11 2015

Peppergrass, Lepidium

Peppergrass 11 11 2015

White Snakeroot, Agaratina altissima

White Snakeroot 11  2015

November Rain, a fine song title, and a pillar source of life for a strong stand of West Village wildflower veterans.

– rPs 11 11 2015

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