Archive for Wildflowers: Green

Mild Winter Early Birds

Mild Winter Early Birds . . .

Forsythia in February!
(NYC 02 12 2020)

You can tell a winter season is a mild one when the mourning dove wakes you with its morning call as early as the middle of February.

Rain rather than snow with plenty of sun in between has brought early flowering greens along with the songbirds. Leap year adds an additional day to the second month of the year, and what’s become clear is this one has been warmer just as Punxsutawney Phil predicted. A brief walk in the park or down a garden block encounters:

Bittercress

Cardamine hirsuta
(02 28 2020)

Chickweed

Stellara media
(NYC 02 23 2020)

Grounsel

Senecio vulgaris
(02 28 2020)

Birds and blooms already in February may forshadow a healthy 2020 growing season for New York City, and a hot one, too.

— rPs 02 29 2020

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Ever Greens

Ever Greens . . .

Xmas Moss
(NYC 12 2019)

Brown, white, and gray dominate an outdoor day explored after Solstice past. A setting reminiscent of Poe’s bleak December can get cultivated along the Hudson when the cold rain falls heavy and straight on a still, chilled day. The poet did know the local atmosphere; he wrote the poem here on the west side of Manhattan, after all.

The living color contrast to be found like an ornament nestled deep within the tree are the ever greens, the lichen and the moss. Both plants savor the cold damp days of December and decorate the more sober wood and stone. Their colors are barometric, the verdant reflects well on the health and vigor of the local air and water.

Welcome news, for those who reside here, or visit often to soak up the season’s songs and lights.

Yule Lichen
(NYC 12 2019)

Season’s Greetings . . .

— rPs 12 30 2019

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Bed Time

Bed Time . . .

Underfoot: colors as savory as those on a Thanksgiving table.
(NYC 11 2019)

The still damp days of October are long gone, as are the bright autumn leaves illuminating the trees. The deep freeze and stiff winds of November have brought down the golden crowns and where rake or leaf blower hasn’t reached there lies a bed of brown oak and others where a few hardy perennial remnants remain nestled in bloom.

One is the bright green of onion grass:

Genus Allium
(11 29 2019)

Another is the rich brown of the boletus mushroom:

Genus Boletus
(11 29 2019)

The overall palette resembles the colors on a Thanksgiving table. Savory to contemplate before the sun makes an early exit.

Up Above: the brown, white, and blue season has returned.
(11 29 2019)

— rPs 11 30 2019

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Ides of March 2019

Ides of March 2019 . . .

Liquidambar styraciflua
(NYC 03 2019)

for New Zealand

Quiet,
Silence.

Riot,
Violence.

Lost cause.
Lost mosques.

Christchurch;
We search.

Gentle
Islands;

We are
Crying.

“Kai su,
Teknon.”

— rPs 03 15 2019

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Lichen the Weather

Lichen the Weather . . .

Lichen in Bloom
(NYC 02 24 2019)

Punxsutawney Phil predicted on February 2nd an early spring. He has been correct but for two spells of clear, cold artic gale.

The freeze left behind the windswept spells softens after just a day or two of damp, soft rain warm enough to compell the morning doves to coo.

The air is crisp, damp, clean, and cool enough for the lichen to flower in the West Village. Ground level, too, starts to stir, sprout, and shoot.

Sprouts
(NYC 02 2019)

Shoots
(NYC 02 2019)

Winter Spring: a new subseason?

— rPs 02 27 2019

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There’s Moss

There’s Moss . . .

Moss Blooms Green
(NYC 2019)


January can be a month of peaks and valleys in terms of temperature. 2019 has been no exception. One day was damp and in the 50s, a few days later, there was gusting wind and single digits.

The green lining to the warmer days is a brief flowering of the moss, the bright green being the first kind of blooming to be seen in the West Village this new year.

Where There’s Moisture, There’s Moss
(NYC 01 2019)

— rPs 01 31 2019

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Holiday Rosettes

Holiday Rosettes . . .

Dandelion, Taraxacum
(NYC 12 2018)

The artful symmetry of plants has compelled my lifelong interest in botany. When the winter season begins damp and mild, as this year’s has, one of the most attractive plant patterns may be seen: the basal rosette.

Plantain, Plantago
(NYC 12 2018)

The fundamental base of the plantain, burdock, and dandelion appear like giant green snowflakes on the moist lawns of Manhattan. The designs are artful, not unlike the rose windows of festive houses of worship.

Burdock, Arctium
(NYC 12 2018)

– rPs 12 30 2018

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