Archive for Wildflowers: Green

Holiday Rosettes

Holiday Rosettes . . .

Dandelion, Taraxacum
(NYC 12 2018)

The artful symmetry of plants has compelled my lifelong interest in botany. When the winter season begins damp and mild, as this year’s has, one of the most attractive plant patterns may be seen: the basal rosette.

Plantain, Plantago
(NYC 12 2018)

The fundamental base of the plantain, burdock, and dandelion appear like giant green snowflakes on the moist lawns of Manhattan. The designs are artful, not unlike the rose windows of festive houses of worship.

Burdock, Arctium
(NYC 12 2018)

– rPs 12 30 2018

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Autumn Greens

Autumn Greens . . .

November: Impressionist Greens (Lichen & Moss)

The language of autumn so often goes to “russet glows” and ‘the tang” conveyed by the leaves, shed, and drying to curls, colors bright of yellow, orange, and red leading to brown.

November, the fleeting, waning of an Equinox, allows a continuity to the growing season when as wet as has been this year. Look closer to see lingering to lushness of veins of rich green nestled within all this glowing russet bed.

Green in the the moss and the lichen feasting on some of the clearest damp air of the year.

Green is the onion grass bathed by the sunset, light framed and focused by a high line of underglowed cloud stretched across the horizon of the Hudson.

Wildflowers in the West Village.

— rPs 11 30 2018

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Earth Day 2017

Earth Day 2017 . . .

Trout Lily, Erythronium americanum
(04 2017)

Happy Earth Day 2017 from Wildflowers of the West Village . . .

Skunk Cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus
(04 2017)

— rPs 04 22 2017

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Media Encounter

Media Encounter . . .

Say

Say “Chickweed.”
(Stellaria media, NYC, 02 2017)

Bright white drops like elongated undyed eggs of Easter. The first Galanthus nivalis were sighted in an otherwise fallow Manhattan flowerbed on Sunday, February 19. Blooms succulent and upright enough; they must have appeared several days earlier. Someone may need to go out more.

Out there, the sky a mix of overcast patched with blue, the grounds have remained cool and damp since the last freeze’s thaw. There is, on the level, vibrant green to be seen wild, growing.

The excitement for me this time out stems from my encounter with the media, pun intended. Happy sight it is to see the immigrant Stellaria media chickweed spreading about in loose communities at the base of planted pines. The tannic, more acidic soil of the evergreen does not seem to be minded by Stellaria of the West Village.

Pine Base Stellaria (NYC, 02 2017)

Pine Base Stellaria
(NYC, 02 2017)

Spring a month in advance, already, looks into the camera:

Say “Chickweed.”

— rPs 02 24 2017

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Year’s End on Track 2016

Year’s End on Track 2016 . . .

Manhattan Carolers (NYBG, NYC, 2016)

Manhattan Carolers
(NYBG, NYC, 2016)

Darkest days of the year descend into darkness when the sun meets the western horizon in a wink’s flash, gone. The lights of the city sparkle to compensate, fill the still cityscape and its river reflections with electric holiday color light.

Perhaps this is why the year’s blooming wild remain near lamp posts and patches off path that capture, even if briefly, the intensity of a low setting sun.

Chenopodium & Lamp Post  (NYC 2016)

Chenopodium & Lamp Post
(NYC 2016)

And another, newer season of light arises.

Our friends at the New York Botanical Garden permitted a contemplative opportunity to see organic plant materials take the form of New York City at the 25th annual Holiday Train Show. Paul Fusse and a squad of artisans have produced a cathartic botanical experience when the landscapes outside stand brown and in slumber under sudden snow.

Inside, under glass, a space large enough to house a copse of trees presents lights on, trains roll. Landmark towers, bridges, and stadiums share trackside space along its length with residential scenes. One favorite, the trio of apartments, rowed side by side, electric lit, stand like singing carolers on a December’s evening.

‘Tis the Season . . . With snow now on the western edge of Manhattan

Snow in Manhattan (NYC 12 17 2016)

Snow in Manhattan
(NYC 12 17 2016)

— rPs 12 19 2016

Postscript:

Read more about artist Paul Fusse and his team of artisans on the NYBG website listed under the Blogroll, or follow this link: http://www.nybg.org/hts16/

Read more about NYC’s regional rail in the new book by author Walter E. Zullig: http://morningsunbooks.com/products/metro-north-in-color-br-i-small-available-october-1-2016-small-i

In memory of Louis J. Amici, Jr. (1947-2016) and Jeff Feldmeier (1966-2016). They always met the train on time.

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What’s The Big Stink?

What’s The Big Stink? . . .

Skunk Cabbage April 2014

Vase on the Forest Floor: Symplocarpus. This North American native is stinky, too. (NYC, April)

Flower in the news . . . Flower in the news in New York City:

What’s the Big Stink?

Good News about to bloom:

My friends at the New York Botanical Garden have enjoyed sharing a rare moment with a most distinctive flowering plant:

Amorphophallus titanum is set to bloom.

 

“What’s the Big Stink?” When the plant flowers the source of that classic phrase may be known.

One may first hear a name: The Corpse Flower.

Omen? As it may have been when one last bloomed in NYC in 1939? Perhaps.

Magnificent? Certain. The scale, the distinctiveness of size and aroma of this plant nurtured “a decade in the making” has, for all that time, communicated enough to us to garner human attention and celebration.

“Bravo!” to . . . THE BLOOM.

— rPs 07 27 2016

 

Postscript: Visit the New York Botanical Garden and view the Corpse Flower Cam by following this link: NYBG/125  http://www.nybg.org/exhibitions/2016/corpse-flower.php

 

One may also visit in the field the somewhat similar, and indigenous, Skunk Cabbage , Symplocarpus, across the New York City area in March:  https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2016/03/21/anniversary-spring/

 

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Summer Blooms

Summer Blooms . . .

 

Plantago major 06 2016

Broadleaf Plantain, Plantago major (NYC 06 2016)

 

Bloomsday passed with a literary flourish on June 16 and now, just a few days later, Summer is here in New York City, or rather as of 6:34 p.m. Eastern Standard Time today, June 20.

Rain or shine, this is the peak time for the Wildflowers of the West Village. Multiple species, in some cases multiples varieties of the same genus, such as the plantains (Plantago) can be found edging lawns and other green spaces throughout the Five Boroughs.

Have a great summer season.

 

Plantago lanceolata 06 2016

English Plantain, Plantago lanceolata (NYC 06 2016)

 

– rPs 06 20 2016

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