Archive for Wildflowers: Blue

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October: Rainy Dayflower Impressionism (NYC 10 2016)

October: Rainy Dayflower Impressionism
(NYC 10 2016)

Clouds deliver rainwater to Manhattan today. Urban Autumn scenes inspire peculiar poetry. An asiatic dayflower (Commelina communis) reminds all of the blues of The Fall. Lines influenced still by the Wildflowers of the West Village . . .

 

The mountaintop,
Being a tip,
Sits lonely.

One who there sits,
Gets it in,
Obviously.

The plateau,
So wide,
So preferred;

Has lost its head,
Lopped off,
Clean cut, carved.

So,
Where is
The tip?

Is it lost,
Did it go,
Did it slip?

With masses
Beyond glasses
Glued to all them,

Here we are,
Not so far,
Near the bottom.

End

– rPs 10 21 2016

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American for French

American for French . . .

 

A NYC daily newspaper headline stated the fact:AGAIN. Here today this American’s Red, White, and Blue supports the Bleu, Blanc et Rouge.

 

BLUE Chickory 07 2016

BLEU (Chichorium intybus 07 2016)

 

WHITE Catalpa 06 2016

WHITE (Catalpa speciosa NYC 07 2016)

 

ROUGE Duo Sumac 07 2016

ROUGE (Rhus glabra 07 2016)

— rPs 07 15 2016

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All In One Month

All In One Month . . .

NYC at Month's End (Joan of Arc Monument, Upper West Side)

NYC at Month’s End
(Joan of Arc Monument, Upper West Side)

The year 2016 began in New York City with an almost springlike feel. A few scattered wildflowers could even be found holding onto one or a few fading blooms. A week passed, and then the first sustained polar cold arrived, which provided frozen views of wildflowers gone to seed. Winter appeared to be shaping into a bright and dry season until, all in one day, the blizzard hit, a wipe out of a white out that has, at least for now, placed the wildflowers of the West Village beneath a white blanket over two feet thick.

What a difference a month can make!

January 1st – Hudson River Park

Chicory (Chicorium intybus)

Chicory
(Chicorium intybus)

January 20 – Harlem Meer, Central Park

Narrowleaf Cattail (Typha augustifolia)

Narrowleaf Cattail
(Typha augustifolia)

January 24 – Somewhere on Manhattan’s West Side

Snow: Knee Deep!

Snow: Knee Deep!

— rPs 01 29 2016

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Veterans

Veterans . . .

Butter & Eggs after rain on Veterans Day, 2015.

Butter & Eggs after rain on Veterans Day, 2015.

Wildflowers, those exposed to so much stress in urban environments, may be presumed to have wrapped up blooming activity by November. Not so along the western edge of Manhattan. Cool wet days under breezy white sky have in succession invigorated lawns and edges alike on the island of Manhattan. The lush green beds support a casserole of multicolored leaves.

The gold of the Ginkgo and Weeping Willow complement the burnt orange of the Sugar Maple, the evergreen and yellow variations of the Norway Maple. The flutter of the individual Black Locust, tiny in comparison to that of the London Plane Tree and Black Oak, dry leaves when stiff the size of a desert plate.

My favorites of the blooming foliage include the fiery tones of the American Sumac, the intricate stylish spades of the living fossil, the Tulip Tree, and the full spectrum splendor of the Liquid Amber, the Sweetgum.

Standing, blooming in their way on the trunks of such trees, one can find lichen in full vigor:

Lichen 11 11 2015

Mushrooms like the Amanita reside in the leaf litter:

November Amanita 11 11 2015

Wildflowers, the second wind of sorts, numerous veterans, though perhaps plain or small or scattered, bloom now in great variety and number. Goldenrod, Galinsoga, Lady’s Thumb, and the Dandelion all still flower here and there. Others encountered during a run in the park may include:

Chicory, Chicorium intybus

Chicory 11 11 2015

Mallow, Marva parviflora

Malva parviflora 11 11 2015

Mugwort, Artemisia vulgaris

Mugwort 11 11 2015

Nightshade, Solanum

Nightshade 11 2015

Peppergrass, Lepidium

Peppergrass 11 11 2015

White Snakeroot, Agaratina altissima

White Snakeroot 11  2015

November Rain, a fine song title, and a pillar source of life for a strong stand of West Village wildflower veterans.

– rPs 11 11 2015

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Summer, Solanum

Summer, Solanum . . .

Solanum nigrum, Manhattan. (08 2015)

Solanum nigrum,
Manhattan.
(08 2015)

New York City wakes to the light of August and the news of fifty days and counting when temperatures have held at 80 degree Fahrenheit or more.

Humidity feeds the air and makes the air felt. The act of breathing becomes an even damper labor requiring calories if on a run to survey wildflowers along Manhattan’s banks of the Hudson River.

Inland, the islands holds tree pits colonized like a kind of microcosm of monoculture. Within squares sprout Galinsoga, Lady’s Thumb, Yellow Sow Thistle, and Marestail.

Marestail, Conyza canadensis, Manhattan. (08 2015)

Marestail,
Conyza canadensis,
Manhattan.
(08 2015)

Not so much the Asiatic Dayflower. Commelina cummunis, which appreciates seasons of high water and a more modest light.

Asiatic Dayflower does not take to prolonged direct sun exposure. (08 2015)

Asiatic Dayflower does not take to prolonged direct sun exposure.
(08 2015)

This season being dry, and hot, one of the most common sights are of tiny black tomatoes hanging in sparse clumps from vigorous stems and ovate green leaves supporting also tiny flowers that resemble sunnyside eggs shaped into five petals arranged as a star.

Solanum nigrum, the Nightshade. August in the Nightshade, or . . .

. . . a Summer, Solanum, with some others remains the steady news of the day.

– rPs 08 26 2015

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Cinco de Mayo and the Mayapple

Cinco de Mayo and the Mayapple . . .

Mayapple (NYC, 2015)

Mayapple
(NYC, 2015)

Cinco de Mayo seems a good time to celebrate the consummate wildflower of May: Podophyllum peltatum, the Mayapple.

Shaded, wooded areas are the best places to seek out the Mayapple. Perennial colonies, each borne on a rhizome, now display the distinctive palmate leaves supported by stems bearing a single bud beneath, which will bloom white and mature into a fruit that always appears like a little treasure in the woodland.

Another regular now in flower is the Virginia Bluebell, Mertensia virginica. Shaded hillsides and groves in Manhattan’s Central Park become carpeted by this variety at this time of year. Specimens found in the parks and neighborhoods of the west side of the island are less dense, yet display just as intense a range of pink buds blending into true blue bell blossoms. The view is gorgeous, yet short lived, this being an ephemeral plant brief of life cycle.

Virginia Bluebell (NYC, 2015)

Virginia Bluebell, NYC
(2015)

NYC Wildflower Week is fast approaching and the city is in full bloom. Uncut park lawns are dressed in many, often immigrant, wildflowers: the purples of Red Deadnettle and Viola, the yellows of Dandelion and Lesser Celandine, the white of Garlic Mustard. Photo examples of these standard bloomers may be found throughout Wildflowers of the West Village.

Disfrutar de las flores!

“You Wanted Color”
pencils on paper
(04 2015)

– rPs 05 05 2015

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Wildflowers of Waikiki

Wildflowers of Waikiki . . .

Frangipani blossom (Plumeria) set in the Hawaiian Airlines logo

Frangipani blossom (Plumeria) set in the Hawaiian Airlines logo

Hawaii begins borne by flowers. “Aloha” is the aroma and sight of flowers around necks, pinned behind ears, hanging from trees. Gardens, lawns, and copses all in bloom as a collective fragrance carries on a mild warm breath off Pacific seawater.

Here are some views from an October 2014 visit to O’ahu . . .

Waikiki 10 2014

Hawaii 2 10 2014

Hawaii 3 102014

Hawaii 4 10 2014

Hawaii 5 10 2014

Paradise Close . . .

Bird of Paradise 10 2014

– rPs 10 31 2014

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