Archive for Wildflower Related

Complements (In Autumn)

Complements (In Autumn) . . .

Inpatiens capensis
(09 2017)

September, mostly sunny, suddenly warmer, humidity hung to the air. All the plants of the city respire as we do, perhaps a bit labored.

Stressed with the start of another brief, eternal fall season, fast in the city, so much possibilty, very busy, and outside of all that, around the outdoor spaces, still in bloom.

Funny to find on an evening walk two of the most attractive signatures of the season, the impatient yet deep orange jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) and the stout yet laced purple mistflower (Conoclinium coelestinum). Colors, partnered together in time, complements on the color wheel of the annual solar cycle.

The kinetic jewelweed can cover its loose bush in orange blooms all primed to pop when disturbed.

The artful mistflower, of a blued purple most pale, posseses a triangular leaf patterned and haired, tailored and well groomed.

Conoclinium coelestinum
(09 2017)

The color of the jewelweed like nectarine, mistflower like lavender. Such gorgeous pairings can be seen untended and free beside some New York City trailways now, after the Autumn Equinox.

– rPs 09 25 2017

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Bloomsday 2017

Bloomsday 2017 . . .

Trifolium Trio
(NYC 06 2017)

Today is Bloomsday.

Title Page:
Ulysses by James Joyce
(NYC 06 16 2017)

Re(ad)-Joyce.

– rPs 06 16 2017

Postscript: Reconnect with the original wwv Bloomsday story here:

https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/06/16/bloomsday/

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NYC Wildflower Week 2017

NYC Wildflower Week 2017 . . .

Ornithogalum umbellatum
(NYC 05 2017)

The ninth annual NYC Wildflower Week has come to a close with another stretch of days, May 6-14, filled with events and programs related to the wild flora of the New York City region.

Read more about the NYCWW team and related activities on its excellent website. A link can be found to the right listed under the Blogroll.

Capsella bursa-pastoris
(NYC 05 2017)

— rPs 05 16 2017

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Earth Day 2017

Earth Day 2017 . . .

Trout Lily, Erythronium americanum
(04 2017)

Happy Earth Day 2017 from Wildflowers of the West Village . . .

Skunk Cabbage, Symplocarpus foetidus
(04 2017)

— rPs 04 22 2017

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8 Yrs.

8 Yrs. . . .

Garden Top: “Where nature and the city intersect.”
(NYC 03 22 2017)

Happy 8th Anniversary, Wildflowers of the West Village.

– rPs 03 22 2017

Postscript: You can revisit the view that instilled an ever growing idea in March 2010: https://wildflowersofthewestvillage.com/2010/03/22/welcome/

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Vernal Equinox 2017

Vernal Equinox 2017 . . .

A Thousand Words About 32 Degrees Fahrenheit.
(NYC 03 2017)

A photo can, at times, say more than words; it can almost give you a chill.

Spring is here.

Happy Vernal Equinox from the still snowy western shore of Manhattan!

– rPs 03 20 2017

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Brown Flowers

Brown Flowers . . .

Brown Flower (NYC 01 2017)

Brown Flower
(NYC 01 2017)

Winds like sudden change bring a dust devil three stories tall. The spiral appears, carries fallen brown leaves and other debris as it pauses, then passes through a rear courtyard in Manhattan. Yesterday there was rain, a week before, snow.

January Snow (NYC 01 2017)

January Snow
(NYC 01 2017)

Temperature. Precipitation. Wind. — The planet has a trio of tools to modulate the weather. This new year has experienced all three in just as many weeks. Climate changes almost day to day with a strobe effect at this local level.

January began with snow under the clearest, cleanest blue and white sky, the nested web of tree bark browns giving glimpses of rows of great buildings beyond.

Snow does not linger under rain. White turns into the waterlogged tans and yellowed green of the unconstructed ground when the fog rolls in with spattered showers. Park turf begins to feel like marsh. Even cross-country runners stick to the hard paths.

January Rain (NYC 01 2017)

January Rain
(NYC 01 2017)

This marks the peak season of the brown flowers. Skeletal remnants of several species continue to covey beauty. There remains a multiplicity of forms to compensate for less diversity of color.

Asteraceae. Brassicaceae. – Asters. Goldenrod. Thistles. Peppercress. – Their upright tresses stand symmetrical, architectural.

There remains a multiplicity of forms to compensate for less diversity of color.

Wildflower beauty endures all kinds of changes in the weather, so far.

– rPs 01 22 2017

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